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By Keith Slater

This booklet is a grammar of Mangghuer, a Mongolic language spoken via nearly 25,000 humans in China's northwestern Qinghai Province. Mangghuer is nearly unknown outdoors China, and no grammar of Mangghuer has ever been released in any language. The book's basic value is therefore as a scientific grammatical description of a little-known language. The publication additionally makes an important contribution to comparative Mongolic reviews. as well as the synchronic description of Mangghuer, wide comparability with different Mongolic languages is integrated, demonstrating the genetic courting of Mangghuer inside that kinfolk. during describing Mangghuer linguistic buildings, the publication additionally examines problems with curiosity to linguistic typologists.

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Extra resources for Grammar of Mangghuer: A Mongolic Language of China's Qinghai-Gansu Sprachbund (Curzon Asian Linguistics)

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The origins of this festival, they suggest, “may be in the festival nomadic Mongolians observe entitled na:dam” though the authors point out that this origin is far from certain. Further description of the nadun festival can be found in Stuart and Hu (1991), which describes the role of the Fala trance medium in course of the nadun. 5 Literacy and education Only a small handful of Mangghuer speakers—perhaps half a dozen—have attempted to work with a written form of this language. Among other Mangghuer, there is no literacy at all in the Mangghuer language.

48a–b) show that the variants wulang and wulan ‘more’ remain distinct, due to vowel quality, even when the final nasal consonants are optionally reduced to just nasalization on the preceding vowel. (48) a [ vuDlqY ~ vuDls] wulang ‘more’ b [ vuDlæn ~ vuDlx] wulan ‘more’ The allophone [ε] also has a fairly restricted distribution, appearing in only one context. It is found when /a/ occurs following a palatal onset consonant and preceding an alveolar nasal coda, as in (49). (49) [\εn] xian ‘first’ (CH: ) Since [ε] is also often an allophone of /e/, it is worth noting the relationship between the two phonemes in these contexts.

It appears word-initially, as in (12a), and word-medially, as in (12b). /q/ does not appear in the coda of a syllable. (12) a [t\h;] qi second person singular pronoun b [nwoDt\hL] nuoqi ‘to pass’ /ch/ is a voiceless aspirated retroflex affricate [tZh]. It appears both word-initially, as in (13a), and word-medially, as in (13b). /ch/ does not appear in any syllable coda. 4 Unaspirated affricates /z/, /j/, /zh/ /z/ is a voiceless unaspirated alveolar affricate [ts]. It appears word-initially, as in (14a), and also word-medially, as in (14b).

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